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20110701
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want to make prior to making any real conclusions, probably is there a connection to pakistan unofficial or otherwise. is this the first attack that we're going to see and the only attack we're going to see? are there going to be more attacks in mumbai or other placesment third and probably most important, how does this affect pakistani-indian relations. that has been a border and boiling point for decades, the indiana yeah and pakistani relations. we are talking to the pakistanis saying, your biggest problem is not india, it's in pakistan and the taliban and terrorist attacks about you. the pakistanis always say, no, no it's india. who you worry about, jon, whoever's fault this is, this will increase tension between india and pakistan and those are two countries who have nuclear weapons. jon: we are looking from the state ride indian television. they are reporting eight people killed. that's what our viewers are seeing on the screen. this comes on the heels of the assassination of president karzai's brother in afghanistan. any likely correction there? >> reporter: not clear.
to the boarder with pakistan. >>> capture or kill. that reportedly is the question the obama administration is internally debating when it comes to what to do about wanted terrorists. we all know capturing suspects in the mountains of pakistan or in yemen is not easy and if the recent uptick in predator drone strikes is any indication it appears the white house has its preference. catherine herridge is live in washington with more. >> with no new detainees at guantanamo bay since march of 2008, they said picking al-qaeda operate evanss up alive is a dangerous task and sent offases they are shent shore until a decision can be made. >> what is the longest we can keep an individual on the ship. >> depends whether we can prosecute them or return them to a third-party country. >> what if you can't do any of those? >> we will release that individual. >> with no consistent policy on detention and prosecution, congressional and intelligence sources tell fox they fear the preemptive option has become the kill option. multiple al-qaeda operatives been killed by cia operations including an alleged pla
. that always raises the spector of the isi in pakistan. >> still photos seem to confirm early reports that the plot relied on improvised explosive devices or ied's plabilitied in parked cars. an attack often associated with afghanistan, iraq and pakistan. but, again tonight there is still no immediate claim of responsibility. that's the same pattern we saw back in 2008, trace. >> trace: catherine, this could effect the united states as well, right? >> as soon as the story broke, the focus was on these similarities with the attack in 2008. that was a rampage that was surprisingly low tech. it relied on 10 pakistani militants armed with cell phones, handguns and backpacks filled with explosives. the group with links to pakistani intelligence was ultimately blamed. leading analysts warn to jumping to any conclusions. >> if the attack were caused to try to provoke a crisis between india and pakistan that would have major complications for the united states. we don't want to see those two countries go into another crisis and fight another war which they have done three times in the past. >
the speckter of the isi in pakistan. >> this morning, new evidence suggests the bombs were planted at a bus shelter, also on a motorcycle and near a parked car. this really shows that these devices were designed to cause maximum casualties and they all went off within a span of 15 minutes, and again, the simultaneous nature of the attacks is a signature of terrorism, heather. heather: they did their jobs. catherine, what does this attack mean for the u.s.? >> well, look, immediately in washington, the focus went back to three years ago and these attacks in mumbai, that was a series of attacks orchestrated by ten pakistani militants armed with cell phones, hand guns and backpacks with explosives. analysts here say if this latest attack causes friction between india and pakistan that could be serious trouble for the u.s. let's listen: >> if the attack were a cause to try to provoke a crisis between india and pakistan that would have major implications for the united states. we do not want to see those two countries go into another crisis and perhaps fight another war, which they've done three
. >> the job is most certainly not done. al qaeda operatives still plan across the border in pakistan. the taliban still try to regain lost ground. still intimidate and still assassinate. >> these attacks on karzai's inner circle are, we're told, likely to get worse as u.s. troops again coming home and through the transition in 2014, shepard. >> shepard: jennifer, thank you. there is word of enough signs two al qaeda groups may be joining forces. u.s. officials are now saying the branch in yemen has given weapons, fighters, beings explosives and training to the affiliate in somalia. yes, ma'am mental and somalia coming together against us. the officials say this is especially dangerous because both groups have recruited u.s. citizens. remember that radical american cleric anwar al awlaki is the leader of al qaeda in yemen. the feds have linked him to recent terror plots against the united states. including the attempted christmas day underwear bombing, the food massacre and botched times square bombing. catherine herridge works intelligence for us live from d.c. tonight. catherine, de
. pakistan is a good example of a country where information sharing among known and suspected terrorists is still lacking. >> it is stunning that pakistan, which is supposed to be our ally in the war against terrorism, does not even share fingerprint data within its own government. it doesn't share it with other pakistanis -- pakistani law enforcement agencies. that's a real problem. >> reporter: so the bottom line is that we can pour billions of dollars into our airport security but the overall system, of course, is only as good as the weakest link, gregg. gregg: the senator said this issue is more now. what has changed in that regard? >> >> reporter: let's take the example of the underwear bomber, it's a good example of a foreign national, in this case a nigerian, who came through yemen and on to amsterdam before he boarded a flight on christmas day in 2009, the american cleric, anwar al-awlaki, the first american on the kill or capture list was the first man there, abdulmutallab, and the bomb maker. >> the threat is far more diverge than it was -- diverse than it was a decade ago. now
. what was his connection to pakistan? there are so many unanswered questions about his overseas connections and what he was really doing and his radicalization during the process in which the military did nothing. and finally, the information the joint terrorism task force had about mr. al laak can i and communications with major hasan at fort hood. why wasn't it shared with general cohen at fort hood when it could have stopped the murder of 13 soldiers? jon: a lot of questions there. let's hope you get answers. congressman, thank you. >> i appreciate it. alisyn: here's what is happening now. joint chiefs chairman admiral mike mullen giving a briefing on the wars in iraq and afghanistan and the defense department budget as the military faces questions about the mounting cost of american involvement in the libyan conflict as well. national security correspondent jennifer griffin live from the pentagon for us. jennifer, what did we learn from this briefing? >> reporter: alisyn, he didn't really speak about the libyan conflict for or the cost of it. discussion was with the pentagon
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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